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W.T. Clarke HS Presents ‘In the Heights’

W.T. Clarke HS Presents ‘In the Heights’ Photo

W.T. Clarke High School’s student acting troupe, Lights Up Productions, gave a riveting performance about the joys and heartbreaks of a tight-knit community when they presented “In the Heights” on March 2-4.

According to the Rodgers and Hammerstein Theatricals website, “In the Heights” is the universal story of a vibrant community in New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood – a place where the coffee from the corner bodega is light and sweet, the windows are always open and the breeze carries the rhythm of three generations of music. It’s a community on the brink of change, full of hopes, dreams and pressures, where the biggest struggles can be deciding which traditions you take with you, and which ones you leave behind.  

Prior to the main performances, the school held a Senior Citizens’ Dinner Theatre, sponsored by the W.T. Clarke PTA in collaboration with the East Meadow Kiwanis and Clarke Theater Arts Parents Association. Community residents were invited for a delicious Italian dinner and a special viewing of this year’s spring musical, with dinner service and ushering provided by members of the W.T. Clarke Middle School Builder’s Club and W.T. Clarke High School Key Club.  

The Lights Up Productions cast and crew would like to express their gratitude to director Kristen Norwark, vocal director Robin Hall, the design team, the stagehands, the tech squad, the orchestra pit – led by W.T. Clarke High School Music Chairperson Stephen Engle – and the district’s central administrators for helping to make the spring musical a success.   



East Meadow Eighth-Grader Advances to National Geographic Bee State Competition

Buzzing About History Photo
Mitchell Goldberg, an eighth-grader at Woodland Middle School has been named a National Geographic Bee semifinalist and will compete in the New York State Geographic Bee 2017 in Albany on March 31. 
After winning his school’s geography bee in January, Mitchell took the online written qualifying test, earning a spot among the top 100 scorers in the state. 

Should he become the state champion, Mitchell will receive $100, the National Geographic Concise Atlas of the World, and qualify to compete in the National Geographic Bee Championship, to be held in Washington, D.C., May 15-17. 

The national champion will receive a $50,000 college scholarship, $500 cash, a lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society, a lifetime subscription to National Geographic magazine and an all-expenses-paid expedition to the Galapagos Islands.

“This has always been a dream of mine,” said Mitchell. “I study every day and am so happy to be given this opportunity to explore my passion for geography.”  

The district wishes Mitchell much success as he continues in the competition.  

Mindfulness and Compassion in the Meadow

Mindfulness and Compassion in the Meadow Photo

Students at Barnum Woods Elementary School expanded upon their social-emotional learning through two special events at the school. One was participation in the schoolwide mindfulness workshops by students in kindergarten through fourth grade. The other was an effort by fifth-graders to raise funds for Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center by building their own arcade games.

During the mindfulness workshops, parents and students gathered in the school’s all-purpose room to participate in deep breathing and meditation activities that taught them how to re-energize and focus on their well-being. The sessions were held with the goal of teaching relaxation and focus within a fast-paced, media-saturated world where students are under pressure to perform well in school and achieve high grades.

While those in grades K-4 turned their focus inward for stress reduction and improved cognition, fifth-graders turned their focus to a beneficial cause in the community. The students were inspired by the film “Caine’s Arcade,” which documents 9-year-old Caine Monroy and his idea that set off a global movement. According to the “Caine’s Arcade” website, Caine built his own cardboard arcade, filled with games and prizes, for customers of his father’s auto parts store. When filmmaker Nirvan Mullick walked in, he became Caine’s first and only customer, leading him to create a movie about Caine’s arcade and establish a scholarship fund for him to attend college. The fifth-graders at Barnum Woods carried out the idea over the course of a month by creating their own arcade games, including foosball, Plinko, and pinball and claw machines. Students paid 25 cents per game for the chance to win a prize, generating a total of $1,400.25 for patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering.



Pay It Forward

Pay It Forward Photo

The members of Woodland Middle School’s Peer Helpers club in the East Meadow School District inspired sixth-graders to make a positive impact on others during their “Pay It Forward” assembly.  This presentation is based on the novel by Catherine Ryan Hyde.

At the opening of the presentation, each sixth grade student was given one blue and one orange index card.  Members of the Peer Helpers wrote a story about one day in the life of a student.  The peer helpers instructed the sixth graders to hold up a blue card when they heard a positive statement and an orange card for negative statements.   As the students held up their color cards, the peer helpers placed the matching color Post-it on a huge heart in the front of the auditorium.  This served as a visual representation of how negative words and feelings can affect an individual in one day.

Following this activity, the students watched a video clip from the movie, Pay It Forward.  The clip explained the theory that if you do something kind for someone, they in turn, will pay it forward to create a chain reaction of positive change.  The Peer Helpers encouraged the sixth-graders to spread kindness throughout the school by extending themselves to other students, whether by saying hello, helping to carry their books to class or sitting with a new student at lunch. 



Reading With A Groovy Guest

Reading With A Groovy Guest Photo

Local officials and community leaders joined professionals from the district on March 16 to read to classes at George McVey Elementary School and encourage a love for reading in the young students.

The visit was part of Guest Reader Day, a special event hosted by McVey near the close of its two-week Pick a Reading Partner program, which ran from March 6-17. Sponsored by the PTA, McVey’s PARP program invited students to delve into the world of literature and engage in reading activities inspired by this year’s theme, “Reading Is Groovy.” 

Among those who read to the students in grades K-6 were Assemblyman Tom McKevitt, Nassau County Legislator Norma Gonzalves, Hempstead Town Clerk Nasrin Ahmad, Hempstead Town Councilman Gary Hudes, East Meadow Board of Education President Marcee Rubinstein, district administrators and other influential community members. 

After the guests had finished reading, the students asked them about their professional careers and how reading has helped them to succeed.



Special Message to the Community – Bond Initiative

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RESIDENTS APPROVE BOND
On Tuesday, March 7, East Meadow residents approved the community’s first joint East Meadow Schools and Public Library capital project bond referendum by a vote of 2,031 Yes to 835 No.

Projects included in this bond will address major repairs and renovations to schools districtwide, improve energy efficiency, support science initiatives, and restore natural grass athletic fields for school and community use. The bond will also fund major repairs and upgrades to the public library that will support additional programs and services, improve energy efficiency and security systems, and increase opportunities for students and patrons.

“The Board of Education and administration would like to thank all community residents who voted on the bond and for their approval and continued support,” said Superintendent of Schools Leon J. Campo. “This is an exciting time for our community and we look forward to improving our schools for our students and for future generations to come.” East Meadow Public Library Director Carol Probeyahn said, “On behalf of the library Board of Directors, we want to thank the community for your vote of support. We are looking forward to improving our library to provide expanded services for our children and community residents.”

Tuesday, March 7 is the East Meadow Public Schools and Public Library joint bond vote. Please plan to be part of the future of our community and remember to vote. Every vote counts! Polls will be open from 7 a.m.-9 p.m. at all elementary schools.

Information on Artificial Turf fields


East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond Presentation
Thursday, March 2, 2017 • 6:30 p.m.
Leon J. Campo Salisbury Center

Prior to 2017-18 Budget Input Session and Board of Education Meeting

East Meadow Joint Bond Vote March 7 from 7 a.m.- 9p.m. at All Elementary Schools
Average annual cost to taxpayers = $57.53 or less than 16¢ per day

On Tuesday, March 7, 2017, residents will have an opportunity to vote on a joint bond referendum proposed by the East Meadow Public Schools and the East Meadow Public Library that, if approved, will renovate and improve the schools and library to better serve students and community residents into the future. For the first time in East Meadow’s history, residents will vote on a joint bond at significant savings to the taxpayer.

The East Meadow schools are more than 60 years old and in need of major repairs and renovations that are too costly to include in the annual school budget without significantly increasing taxes and/or cutting programs and services to students. The public library has not undertaken a major renovation in more than 30 years, and requires major repairs and upgrades.

The bond initiative will fund the repairs and renovations to the schools, improve energy efficiency, support science initiatives and restore the district’s natural grass athletic fields for school and community use. The proposed bond would also support major repairs and upgrades to the public library to enhance additional programs and services, improve energy efficiency and security systems and increase opportunities to serve students and patrons.

During the life span of the bond, the average annual cost to the taxpayer is $57.53, or approximately 16¢ per day. The projected average annual cost to the taxpayer is calculated using the average assessed property value as determined by the Nassau County Assessor’s Office. It is anticipated the work in the schools will begin during the summer of 2018 and the library work will also begin sometime in 2018.

This is an exciting time for the community. All residents are encouraged to vote on Tuesday, March 7, from 7 a.m.-9 p.m., at all district elementary schools. For more information, visit the school district website at www.eastmeadow.k12.ny.us or the library website at www.eastmeadow.info. You can also find information on the bond on Facebook by liking East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond.



School District and Public Library Joint Bond Referendum
In a joint decision, the first of its kind in the community’s history, the school district and public library plan to propose a single bond referendum that would support major renovations and improvements to both the district’s schools and athletic facilities, and the public library. If approved by voters, the proposed work will bring the public library into the 21st century and facilitate greater opportunities to serve the community, while the school district will be able to address much needed repairs and improve its instructional space and athletic facilities at schools that are more than 60 years old.

Attachments:

Driver's Education Spring Program

* Tuesday Classes from 3/14 that were cancelled will be made up on Wed. 3/22 at the same times.

Attachments:

East Meadow Students Receive President’s Volunteer Service Award

East Meadow Students Receive President’s Volunteer Service Award
W.T. Clarke High School senior Rachel Seong and East Meadow High School junior Shermeen Khan have received the President’s Volunteer Service Award for their exceptional voluntary work in the community.

The President’s Volunteer Service Award honors U.S. citizens who have volunteered significant amounts of their time over a 12-month period to assist their communities and their country.

Rachel has been volunteering at her local church, Yale Korean Presbyterian Church in Hicksville, since the age of 14. She is a teaching assistant for the church’s summer school program and attends mission trips to build mobile-friendly homes for disabled people through the church’s partnership with Group Mission Trips. As part of a mission trip last summer, she spent a week doing renovation work on a home for a family in Schenectady, New York. Over the course of one year, she volunteered 204 hours, meriting her designation as a silver award recipient.  

Outside of volunteering, Rachel is enrolled in numerous Advanced Placement courses and plays the clarinet, piano and tennis. She is interested in studying pharmaceutical sciences in college.
 
With her passion for serving others starting at an early age, Shermeen has been involved in the Kiwanis Kids club at George McVey Elementary School, the Builder’s Club at Woodland Middle School and the Key Club at East Meadow High School. She currently serves as the student chairperson for the North Shore University Hospital Foundation’s Kiwanis Pediatric Trauma Center, for which she organizes fundraisers, serves as a liaison between the organization and high school students, and speaks to volunteers and potential donors about the organization’s mission.

In addition to her volunteer service, Shermeen is a board member of her school’s Ethnic Awareness club and a member of the Math Team, Key Club, Students Against Destructive Decisions and Science Research, as well as the Science, Social Studies, Business, Spanish and National honor societies. She is also a member of Glamour Girls, which provides retirement home residents with cosmetic services such as hairstyling and manicures.   

The district commends Rachel and Shermeen for their exemplary service to the community and wishes them the best of luck in their future endeavors.


Jumping to the Heartbeat

Jumping to the Heartbeat

Parkway Elementary School students raised more than $5,000 for the American Heart Association by participating in the schoolwide Jump Rope for Heart program on Feb. 16. Fourth-grader Jace D’Jon raised the most money this year, gardening a total of $575.

According to its website, the American Heart Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To assist in the battle, schools can host Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart fundraisers that promote physical activity, heart healthy living and community service.

During their gym classes, students in grades 1-5 divided into groups where they exercised their heart muscles by jumping rope to popular pop music and played double dutch with gym teachers Kelly Rohan and Michael Romanotto. They also learned about the importance of living a healthy lifestyle while raising money for the community.  

A special thank-you to the Parkway PTA for providing refreshments for students to recharge while working out.  





Tuesday, March 28 - Self Determination - Self Directed Services Workshop 7:00 -9:00 PM

Attachments:

Wednesday April 5 - Self-Directed Legal Guardianship Workshop 7:00-9:00 PM

Attachments:

RESIDENTS APPROVE BOND

On Tuesday, March 7, East Meadow residents approved the community’s first joint East Meadow Schools and Public Library capital project bond referendum by a vote of 2,031 Yes to 835 No.

Projects included in this bond will address major repairs and renovations to schools districtwide, improve energy efficiency, support science initiatives, and restore natural grass athletic fields for school and community use. The bond will also fund major repairs and upgrades to the public library that will support additional programs and services, improve energy efficiency and security systems, and increase opportunities for students and patrons.

“The Board of Education and administration would like to thank all community residents who voted on the bond and for their approval and continued support,” said Superintendent of Schools Leon J. Campo. “This is an exciting time for our community and we look forward to improving our schools for our students and for future generations to come.” East Meadow Public Library Director Carol Probeyahn said, “On behalf of the library Board of Directors, we want to thank the community for your vote of support. We are looking forward to improving our library to provide expanded services for our children and community residents.”

Two East Meadow Seniors Named National Merit finalists

Two East Meadow Seniors Named National Merit finalists
Two seniors from the district — Jordan Diamond from East Meadow High School and Alby Joseph from W.T. Clarke High School — have been recognized as finalists in the 2017 National Merit Scholarship Program.
 
To become one of the nation’s 15,000 finalists, Jordan and Alby had to submit a detailed scholarship application including their academic record, participation in extracurricular activities and community engagement, leadership ability, employment, and record of honors and awards. They also had to achieve an SAT score equivalent to their PSAT score, maintain their prestigious academic performance and receive a recommendation from a high school official.

The seniors will be notified this spring as to whether they are among the 7,500 students who have been selected to receive awards and scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Program based on their abilities, skills and accomplishments. Members of the NMS committee will evaluate the seniors’ academic records, the curricula and grading systems at their schools, and their SAT scores, high school officials’ recommendations, information about their activities and leadership, and finalist essays.

 “I was pretty excited when I heard I was a finalist,” said Jordan. “This advancement is a rewarding reflection of my hard work. I believe the additional materials I submitted to the competition, such as the personal essay, also contributed to this designation.”

Jordan is involved in numerous organizations at East Meadow High School, including membership in the National Honor Society and Social Studies Honor Society. He also serves as president of Model Congress, the Environmental Club, and the Math and Research Club. In addition, he belongs to the school’s peer mentoring program, where he educates younger students about bullying and the dangers of alcohol and drug consumption. Within the program, he also mentors a fellow East Meadow High School student, providing guidance and friendship throughout the year.

Outside of school, Jordan volunteers as a student teacher at his temple, teaching Hebrew to sixth-graders. He also interned at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County, where he researched how American journalists wrote about the Holocaust and its development in Germany during the 1930s and ’40s. His research was featured in exhibits for museumgoers.

Jordan plans to major in mathematics after graduation.

W.T. Clarke High School’s Alby Joseph balances a rigorous schedule of Advanced Placement and college-level courses while immersing himself in an assortment of extracurricular activities. Among these, he is co-president of the school’s Tri-M Music, Science and National honor societies. He is also a member of the Math Honor Society, the school newspaper, Mathletes and Science Olympiad. With a passion for the cello, he has performed for the last three years in the pit orchestra for the school’s plays, in the All-State Festival at the New York State School Music Association 2016 Winter Conference, and will perform at the upcoming National Association for Music Education’s 2017 Biennial Eastern Division Conference, the Nassau Music Educators Association All-County Festival and the Long Island String Festival Association’s Nassau Secondary Festival.      

Along with this exceptional achievement, Alby was recognized as a scholar in the 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Search and was named a semifinalist in the 2016 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology.

“After hearing I was a finalist in the National Merit Scholarship Program, I realized how appreciative I am for my time at Clarke,” Alby said. “I am beyond thankful for the opportunities I had while growing up in the East Meadow School District.”

Alby wishes to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the fall, where he’ll study chemical engineering.

The district congratulates both students on becoming finalists in this prestigious program.    


Lending A Hand

Lending A Hand

Members of the Bowling Green Elementary School Kiwanis Kids recently teamed up to help young children in Indonesia and Nicaragua pursue their educational dreams through the Bezos Family Foundation’s Students Rebuild Youth Uplift Challenge.

The students assembled on Feb. 27 to cut out paper hands and inscribe messages on them using crayons, colored pencils and markers. The uplifting messages suggested ways to make the world a better place, such as preserving the earth, being kind to all and helping others.

According to its website, the Bezos Family Foundation was created in 2010 in response to the devastating Haiti earthquake with the mission of assisting young people to achieve their full potential and make a meaningful contribution to society through education. The Youth Uplift Challenge invests in financial literacy, job and entrepreneurship training, and youth-led groups and networks to help young people overcome the setbacks of poverty. For every hand sent in, the Bezos Family Foundation donates $1.90 — up to $500,000 — to Save the Children’s programs, which empower youth in Indonesia and Nicaragua to rise into the life they dream of.  

The Bowling Green Kiwanis Kids club made and sent in 180 hands garnering a total of $342 to the organization.





74 Creative Minds Inducted Into East Meadow’s Art Honor Society

74 Creative Minds Inducted Into East Meadow’s Art Honor Society

A total of 74 high school students in the district – 42 from East Meadow High School and 32 from W.T. Clarke High School – were inducted into the district’s National Art Honor Society in a ceremony on Feb. 28.

To become a member of the East Meadow chapter, students must be in grades 10-12, maintain an unweighted GPA of 85 percent and have a 90 percent or higher average in their art classes.

NAHS advisors Gerard Ferrara and Jane Pawlowski of East Meadow High School and W.T. Clarke High School, respectively, opened the ceremony by recognizing the talented inductees for their hard work and dedication to the arts and their studies. Following, both schools’ NAHS presidents shared how art has impacted their lives and reflected on how it takes courage to make art in today’s society.  

Continuing the celebration, guest speaker Frank Dentrone, a W.T. Clarke High School English teacher, expressed ways in which art has influenced his life and bestowed words of wisdom upon the honorees.

“My advice to you is to stay young, my friends,” said Mr. Dentrone. “Keep your eyes open for new things even in the most mundane situations, and keep your hearts open to that creative voice within you for as long as you can. I do believe you’re going to need it.”  

After taking the honor society pledge, the inductees joined fellow NAHS members and guests for light refreshments in the art gallery, where they toured an exhibit of artwork created by members of the society.   






Donating More Than Pennies

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Meadowbrook and Parkway elementary schools raised more than $5,000 collectively for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society through their respective Pennies for Patients fundraisers.

During the three-week fundraisers, which were conducted under the guidance of Daniela Murphy, the social worker at both schools, students in grades K-5 were asked to donate spare change and create collection boxes so that their friends, families and neighbors would donate as well.

At the end of each school day, students sent their donations to the main office, where Ms. Murphy tallied each grade’s daily contribution. Meadowbrook surpassed its goal and accumulated a total of $3,060 – the largest donation ever raised for Pennies for Patients in school history. Parkway exceeded its objective, accruing a total of $2,000.

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Campaign Specialist Alexa Landro visited the schools on Feb. 15 to accept the total donation of $5,060. She thanked the students for their generous contribution and explained that their donations will assist in finding cures and improving the quality of life for cancer patients and their families.
Since 2007, both schools have raised more than $20,000 each for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.


Buzzing About History

Buzzing About History1
Four W.T. Clarke Middle School students have qualified for the New York Regional National History Bee.

The school’s qualifiers — seventh-grader James Griesing and eighth-graders Andrew Garces, Nick Spano and Roberto Sison — had taken an in-class written exam on both U.S. and global history and were among the top 20 highest scorers in the school. Having excelled on the online exam, which was the next step of the competition, they will now advance to the regional finals, to be held in Cedar Grove, New Jersey, on April 21.

At the regional finals, the students will participate in three rounds of fast-paced and interactive buzzer-format competition against other students in the region to determine who will advance to nationals.

The district wishes James, Andrew, Nick and Roberto much success as they move forward in the competition.     

Famous Americans Parade the Hallways of Barnum Woods

Famous Americans Parade the Hallways of Barnum Woods

The hallways of Barnum Woods Elementary School were filled with distinguished historical figures, thinkers and inventors as second-graders marched in the Famous Americans Parade on Feb. 15.

Prior to the celebration, held to honor Presidents Day, the students spent months researching innovators in American history, learning about their childhood, discoveries and impact upon the world. Among the illustrious individuals were Betsy Ross, Neil Armstrong, John F. Kennedy, Amelia Earhart, Juliette Gordon Low and George Washington.

After completing their research projects, the second-graders created costumes resembling their characters for the school’s Famous Americans Parade, during which they walked the halls and visited other classrooms to present facts about their historical person. Their peers were able to ask questions and guess who the students portrayed.

Helping Others Through The Love Of Sports

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Seventh- and eighth-graders at Woodland Middle School put their love for sports into practice as they raised money for Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The school’s athletic department hosted two fundraisers to benefit the causes — a powder puff football game and a volleyball tournament.

Assistant Principals Patricia Graham and Christine Egan led two teams of students for the football game. Students, teachers and administrators paid $2 to watch the game on the school’s football field, raising a total of $780 for Memorial Sloan Kettering.

On Jan. 3, the girls volleyball team held a round-robin tournament, where teams played each other for five minutes in elimination rounds until two final teams were set to play. The tournament raised $200 for St. Jude.

Scoring More Than Baskets

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W.T. Clarke Middle School students raised more than $800 for the American Heart Association by participating in the schoolwide Hoops for Heart program from Jan. 23-27.   

According to its website, the American Heart Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To assist in the battle, schools can host Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart fundraisers that promote physical activity, heart healthy living and community service.

 During their gym classes, students rotated among stations to enhance their basketball skills by practicing ball control and making jump shots and layups. Afterward, the classes participated in a knockout tournament, eliminating each other by scoring baskets before their opponent until two finalists were left to face off in a championship match-up.

Caught Being Kind

Caught Being Kind
Students at Meadowbrook Elementary School exemplified good character by participating in the school’s Random Acts of Kindness Week from Feb. 13-17.

Students in grades K-5 engaged in activities and assemblies that modeled kindness and respect. With each day carrying a different theme, they learned about the importance of manners and speaking to others with kind words, took turns on the playground, donated pet supplies to the school’s Kiwanis Kids animal shelter drive and engaged with fellow students they did not know well.

As a visual display of the good deeds happening throughout the week, the students wrote their acts of kindness on paper fish, which were then posted on a “Caught Being Kind” bulletin board in the main lobby.   

The Gift Of A Good Book

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Through their collaborative efforts, the entire fourth grade at Bowling Green Elementary School held a book drive that yielded more than 300 books for pediatric patients at Nassau University Medical Center.

Before the collection began, the students created flyers, delivered morning announcements and visited classrooms explaining the purpose of the drive, which was to collect gently used or new books for children at NUMC and their families.

Linda Walsh, the NUMC executive director for the NuHealth Foundation, visited the school on Feb. 17 to accept the numerous boxes of donations and thank the fourth-graders for improving the lives of patients with the gift of a good book.  

A Soup-er Bowl of Caring

A Soup-er Bowl of Caring
W.T. Clarke Middle School students recently held their annual Soup-er Bowl food drive, collecting more than 100 pounds of nonperishable food items for Island Harvest, a nonprofit established in 1992 to end hunger and reduce food waste on Long Island.

On the day of collection, students were encouraged to wear their favorite team jersey or Clarke spirit-wear as they donated items such as soup, pasta, cereal and snacks for those in need.  


District Hosts 10th Annual Braille Challenge

District Hosts 10th Annual Braille Challenge

The district hosted the 10th annual Long Island Regional Braille Challenge for students of Braille on Feb. 4 at W.T. Clarke High School.
The Braille Challenge is an academic competition developed by the Braille Institute of America to motivate school-aged visually impaired or blind children to continue their study of Braille.

During the challenge’s opening ceremony, members of the W.T. Clarke High School pep band performed as the six participants gathered in the Little Theater for recognition.

In his welcoming remarks, Superintendent of Schools Leon J. Campo acknowledged these students who excel in the study of Braille.
“We’re here today to recognize our Braille champions as they continue to accomplish, overcome and demonstrate what they are capable of,” he said. “We are the beneficiaries of their hard work.”                          
Patrice Dobies, the district’s director of special education and pupil personnel services, expressed her gratitude to the district, Board of Education, Braille Challenge Coordinator Petra Tarrant, volunteers and sponsors for hosting and coordinating the annual event.

“Thank you to everyone who made today’s Braille Challenge a success,” she said. “This day could not have happened without all of your hard work, dedication and commitment. I am so proud of all these students and am blown away by their amazing ability to read and write in Braille.”
Following, students had the opportunity to participate in three interactive workshops. In the first, they practiced martial arts and self-defense techniques with Sensei Devin Fernandez from Third Eye Insight in West Islip. With the help of volunteers, participants learned defensive moves using their knees, fists and elbows.  

The students transitioned to the classroom for the second workshop, where they displayed their proficiency in reading, writing and comprehending in Braille. They also created valentines using cookie cutters, metallic paper and stickers.

During the third activity, students met and played with members of the Long Island Bombers Beep Baseball team, a group of players who demonstrate their version of baseball by using beeping baseballs and bases. The young students ran the bases and located the baseball from the sound of its buzzing.  

At the closing ceremony, the students received Braille Institute medallions, certificates of recognition and goody bags for participating in this year’s 10th annual Braille Challenge. Participants and their families also attended a brunch graciously provided by the East Meadow Special Education PTA.

Among the participants in the Braille Challenge were Meadowbrook Elementary School second-grader Kayla Ochtera, Bowling Green Elementary School third-grader Matthew Palmeri and Woodland Middle School seventh-grader Robbie Stahl.

The regional event is the first step toward the national competition, which will be held in June at the Braille Institute’s headquarters in Los Angeles. Students from across the nation are in the process of completing preliminary testing in the hopes of qualifying among the top-scoring 60 contestants. Those top scorers will advance to nationals to represent their state as they compete against the best Braille students from across the United States and Canada.





Honoring Our National Parks

Honoring Our National Parks
Honoring Our National Parks 2
Honoring Our National Parks 3
Fifth-graders at Meadowbrook Elementary School commemorated the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service by conducting research on the history of 25 U.S. parks.

For six weeks, the classes of Valerie Kasper, Emily Caroddo and Kara Riley researched the locations, wildlife and history of the parks including the Everglades, Zion, Grand Tetron and Arches during their computer class with the assistance of technology teacher Taylor Stoessel.

After compiling their information, the students spent an additional six weeks creating presentations using Microsoft Office Sway. The program allowed them to present their final projects to their classmates with interactive videos and high-definition photos.

The activity, which aligned with the fifth-graders’ social studies curriculum, taught them valuable skills in research and public speaking while providing an in-depth lesson in U.S. geography and history.

Super Bowl Scholars

Super Bowl Scholars
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Third-graders at Parkway Elementary School proved to be fantastic football fans as they completed several assignments related to the Super Bowl on Feb. 3.

Kristi De Lace’s class celebrated the Falcons vs. Patriots face-off with projects, activities and treats. The students researched the history of the Super Bowl and its past winners, presented their facts through charts, learned about biographies as they answered questions about Matt Ryan and Tom Brady, and predicted this year’s winner. They used multiplication to review Super Bowl squares and improved their geography and map skills as they located states that hosted previous Super Bowls.
 
The day was not without its artistic element, which the third-graders embraced as they created persuasive posters designed to influence others’ decisions about which team to root for. The front of the classroom was decorated with the creative posters, with equal representation of both the Patriots and Falcons.
 
Overall, the Super Bowl learning experience involved reading, writing, technology, research and math. Thanks to parent volunteers, students enjoyed typical game-day snacks, football-themed lollipops and a field of cupcakes after completing their work.


Clarke HS VE Students Compete at Regional Trade Show

Clarke HS VE Students Compete at Regional Trade Show

The Virtual Enterprise class at W.T. Clarke High School demonstrated their business acumen and ingenuity when they competed in the Virtual Enterprise International Northeast Regional Trade Show at Farmingdale State College on Jan. 13.

According to its website, VEI is a global business simulation that offers students a competitive edge through project-based, collaborative learning and the development of 21st-century skills in entrepreneurship, global business, problem-solving, communication, personal finance and technology.

Consisting of 19 seniors, W.T. Clarke’s VE class mimics the operations of a real business, with departments including accounting, marketing, human resources and web design. The company is entirely student-run, with teacher Joseph Pavia acting as its consultant. In addition to managing its daily operations on a multi-departmental level, the students also evaluate employee growth and receive a virtual salary that can be spent on products and services offered by other schools’ VE firms, both local and international.

W.T. Clarke’s firm, Munchkings, sells snack mixes that are customized to targeted consumer groups’ tastes. The “Lazy Man Mix,” for example, is an assortment of potato chips, popcorn, chocolate candies and mini chocolate chip cookies and is geared toward the armchair athlete, while the “Veggie Mix” is a blend for the more health-conscious consisting of veggie straws, veggie chips and pressure-cooked potato chips.

At the regional show, the Munchkings’ administrative team presented their 30-page business plan and a 15-minute PowerPoint presentation to a panel of judges. In addition, undercover judges walked the sales floor to analyze the businesses of more than 900 students. They awarded the Munchkings first place for best sales pitch and second place for most enthusiastic firm, the latter bestowed upon those companies that exhibit the most passion, energy and perseverance.

“This is not an ordinary class,” said Pavia. “My students always amaze me with their dedication, hard work and perseverance. I am very fortunate to teach this class and am beyond grateful for the incredible support I receive from my administrators.”  

The results have not calculated, but if the Munchkings advance, they will participate in VEI’s 2017 Youth Business Summit, a national-level competition that will be held in New York City from April 3-5. This competition brings school firms from all over the U.S. and the world to trade live with each other.

The East Meadow School District wishes the Munchkings much success as they continue in the competition.



United Through Art

United Through Art

Lessons in character education were promoted as the entire student body at Bowling Green Elementary School lent their hand to a “unity mural” outside of the school’s library.

The project, led by Joyce Raimondo, founder and director of Imagine That! Art Education, was open to all first- through fifth-graders. With smocks tied on and paintbrushes in hand, the students worked together to create a dynamic, colorful masterpiece that illustrates positive character traits and embodies the school’s motto of respect, citizenship, trustworthiness and caring.

Their teamwork and collaboration resulted in a masterpiece that teachers, staff and administrators will enjoy for years to come.

East Meadow Board of Education Recognizes Alan Hodish

East Meadow Board of Education Recognizes Alan Hodish
East Meadow Board of Education Recognizes Alan Hodish 2
During their Jan. 19 meeting, the East Meadow Board of Education recognized district resident Alan Hodish for his service to the community. The Board presented him with a certificate of recognition for his many years of advocacy and dedicated service to the children of East Meadow.
    
“This recognition is long overdue,” said Superintendent of Schools Leon Campo. “On behalf of the administration, school district and Board, I am particularly proud to recognize one of our most outstanding East Meadowites, Alan Hodish, for his involvement in the East Meadow community. Alan is highly deserving of our praise because he has worked tirelessly over many years to develop a relationship with our students that has made a difference in their lives.”  
    
The evening was punctuated with musical performances by the brass ensemble from W.T. Clarke High School and kindergartners from Barnum Woods and Parkway elementary schools. Led by the Enrichment Through the Arts teachers, the Barnum Woods young children, sang “I’m a Little Snowman” to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot” and “Down by the Bay” while the Parkway kindergarteners dressed in patriotic colors, performed “Red, White and Blue.”   


2017-2018 Application for ALL Non-Public Students

The attached application is for ALL Non-Public Students for the 2017-2018 School Year.

Residents are reminded of New York State Education Law 3635-2 requiring parents/guardians of students who plan to attend private or parochial school to submit a written request annually to their public school district.

The East Meadow School District must be in receipt of the application for transportation and textbooks on or before the New York State Education Department's legal deadline of April 1 to be considered for the following school year. In order for the April 1 request letter to be considered, all students must be officially registered with the East Meadow School District. Applications must be, according to statute, filed annually. A separate application is required for each child.

It is the applicant's responsibility to confirm the district's receipt of your application prior to April 1.

Attachments:

East Meadow Eighth-Graders Conquer Geography Bee

East Meadow Eighth-Graders Conquer Geography Bee
East Meadow Eighth-Graders Conquer Geography Bee 2
Woodland Middle School’s Mitchell Goldberg and W.T. Clarke Middle School’s Nicholas Spano, recently earned their school’s geography bee champion title.
    
Held at their respective buildings, middle schoolers participated in the school-level competition of the 29th annual National Geographic Bee, for which they answered questions covering numerous facets of geography in the United States and the world.
    
Both winners will join students from across the country in taking an online written test as part of the next round of competition. The top 100 scorers in each state will then be eligible to compete in their state bee. The state winners will advance to the national championship rounds in Washington, D.C., where they will have the chance to win a $50,000 college scholarship.
    
The district wishes Mitchell and Nicholas much success as they continue in the competition.

Spring 2017 Continuing Education Guide

Attachments: