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East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond Presentation



East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond Presentation
Thursday, March 2, 2017 • 6:30 p.m.
Leon J. Campo Salisbury Center

Prior to 2017-18 Budget Input Session and
Board of Education Meeting



Famous Americans Parade the Hallways of Barnum Woods

Famous Americans Parade the Hallways of Barnum Woods

The hallways of Barnum Woods Elementary School were filled with distinguished historical figures, thinkers and inventors as second-graders marched in the Famous Americans Parade on Feb. 15.

Prior to the celebration, held to honor Presidents Day, the students spent months researching innovators in American history, learning about their childhood, discoveries and impact upon the world. Among the illustrious individuals were Betsy Ross, Neil Armstrong, John F. Kennedy, Amelia Earhart, Juliette Gordon Low and George Washington.

After completing their research projects, the second-graders created costumes resembling their characters for the school’s Famous Americans Parade, during which they walked the halls and visited other classrooms to present facts about their historical person. Their peers were able to ask questions and guess who the students portrayed.

Special Message to the Community – Bond Initiative

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East Meadow Joint Bond Vote March 7 from 7 a.m.- 9p.m. at All Elementary Schools
Average annual cost to taxpayers = $57.53 or less than 16¢ per day

On Tuesday, March 7, 2017, residents will have an opportunity to vote on a joint bond referendum proposed by the East Meadow Public Schools and the East Meadow Public Library that, if approved, will renovate and improve the schools and library to better serve students and community residents into the future. For the first time in East Meadow’s history, residents will vote on a joint bond at significant savings to the taxpayer.

The East Meadow schools are more than 60 years old and in need of major repairs and renovations that are too costly to include in the annual school budget without significantly increasing taxes and/or cutting programs and services to students. The public library has not undertaken a major renovation in more than 30 years, and requires major repairs and upgrades.

The bond initiative will fund the repairs and renovations to the schools, improve energy efficiency, support science initiatives and restore the district’s natural grass athletic fields for school and community use. The proposed bond would also support major repairs and upgrades to the public library to enhance additional programs and services, improve energy efficiency and security systems and increase opportunities to serve students and patrons.

During the life span of the bond, the average annual cost to the taxpayer is $57.53, or approximately 16¢ per day. The projected average annual cost to the taxpayer is calculated using the average assessed property value as determined by the Nassau County Assessor’s Office. It is anticipated the work in the schools will begin during the summer of 2018 and the library work will also begin sometime in 2018.

This is an exciting time for the community. All residents are encouraged to vote on Tuesday, March 7, from 7 a.m.-9 p.m., at all district elementary schools. For more information, visit the school district website at www.eastmeadow.k12.ny.us or the library website at www.eastmeadow.info. You can also find information on the bond on Facebook by liking East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond.



School District and Public Library Joint Bond Referendum
In a joint decision, the first of its kind in the community’s history, the school district and public library plan to propose a single bond referendum that would support major renovations and improvements to both the district’s schools and athletic facilities, and the public library. If approved by voters, the proposed work will bring the public library into the 21st century and facilitate greater opportunities to serve the community, while the school district will be able to address much needed repairs and improve its instructional space and athletic facilities at schools that are more than 60 years old.

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ACCESS Workshop: Never Alone - March 21, 2017

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A Soup-er Bowl of Caring

A Soup-er Bowl of Caring
W.T. Clarke Middle School students recently held their annual Soup-er Bowl food drive, collecting more than 100 pounds of nonperishable food items for Island Harvest, a nonprofit established in 1992 to end hunger and reduce food waste on Long Island.

On the day of collection, students were encouraged to wear their favorite team jersey or Clarke spirit-wear as they donated items such as soup, pasta, cereal and snacks for those in need.  


East Meadow Joint Bond Vote March 7 from 7 a.m.- 9p.m. at All Elementary Schools

Average annual cost to taxpayers = $57.53 or less than 16¢ per day

On Tuesday, March 7, 2017, residents will have an opportunity to vote on a joint bond referendum proposed by the East Meadow Public Schools and the East Meadow Public Library that, if approved, will renovate and improve the schools and library to better serve students and community residents into the future. For the first time in East Meadow’s history, residents will vote on a joint bond at significant savings to the taxpayer.

The East Meadow schools are more than 60 years old and in need of major repairs and renovations that are too costly to include in the annual school budget without significantly increasing taxes and/or cutting programs and services to students. The public library has not undertaken a major renovation in more than 30 years, and requires major repairs and upgrades.

The bond initiative will fund the repairs and renovations to the schools, improve energy efficiency, support science initiatives and restore the district’s natural grass athletic fields for school and community use. The proposed bond would also support major repairs and upgrades to the public library to enhance additional programs and services, improve energy efficiency and security systems and increase opportunities to serve students and patrons.

During the life span of the bond, the average annual cost to the taxpayer is $57.53, or approximately 16¢ per day. The projected average annual cost to the taxpayer is calculated using the average assessed property value as determined by the Nassau County Assessor’s Office. It is anticipated the work in the schools will begin during the summer of 2018 and the library work will also begin sometime in 2018.

This is an exciting time for the community. All residents are encouraged to vote on Tuesday, March 7, from 7 a.m.-9 p.m., at all district elementary schools. For more information, visit the school district website at www.eastmeadow.k12.ny.us or the library website at www.eastmeadow.info. You can also find information on the bond on Facebook by liking East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond.


District Hosts 10th Annual Braille Challenge

District Hosts 10th Annual Braille Challenge

The district hosted the 10th annual Long Island Regional Braille Challenge for students of Braille on Feb. 4 at W.T. Clarke High School.
The Braille Challenge is an academic competition developed by the Braille Institute of America to motivate school-aged visually impaired or blind children to continue their study of Braille.

During the challenge’s opening ceremony, members of the W.T. Clarke High School pep band performed as the six participants gathered in the Little Theater for recognition.

In his welcoming remarks, Superintendent of Schools Leon J. Campo acknowledged these students who excel in the study of Braille.
“We’re here today to recognize our Braille champions as they continue to accomplish, overcome and demonstrate what they are capable of,” he said. “We are the beneficiaries of their hard work.”                          
Patrice Dobies, the district’s director of special education and pupil personnel services, expressed her gratitude to the district, Board of Education, Braille Challenge Coordinator Petra Tarrant, volunteers and sponsors for hosting and coordinating the annual event.

“Thank you to everyone who made today’s Braille Challenge a success,” she said. “This day could not have happened without all of your hard work, dedication and commitment. I am so proud of all these students and am blown away by their amazing ability to read and write in Braille.”
Following, students had the opportunity to participate in three interactive workshops. In the first, they practiced martial arts and self-defense techniques with Sensei Devin Fernandez from Third Eye Insight in West Islip. With the help of volunteers, participants learned defensive moves using their knees, fists and elbows.  

The students transitioned to the classroom for the second workshop, where they displayed their proficiency in reading, writing and comprehending in Braille. They also created valentines using cookie cutters, metallic paper and stickers.

During the third activity, students met and played with members of the Long Island Bombers Beep Baseball team, a group of players who demonstrate their version of baseball by using beeping baseballs and bases. The young students ran the bases and located the baseball from the sound of its buzzing.  

At the closing ceremony, the students received Braille Institute medallions, certificates of recognition and goody bags for participating in this year’s 10th annual Braille Challenge. Participants and their families also attended a brunch graciously provided by the East Meadow Special Education PTA.

Among the participants in the Braille Challenge were Meadowbrook Elementary School second-grader Kayla Ochtera, Bowling Green Elementary School third-grader Matthew Palmeri and Woodland Middle School seventh-grader Robbie Stahl.

The regional event is the first step toward the national competition, which will be held in June at the Braille Institute’s headquarters in Los Angeles. Students from across the nation are in the process of completing preliminary testing in the hopes of qualifying among the top-scoring 60 contestants. Those top scorers will advance to nationals to represent their state as they compete against the best Braille students from across the United States and Canada.





Scoring More Than Baskets

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W.T. Clarke Middle School students raised more than $800 for the American Heart Association by participating in the schoolwide Hoops for Heart program from Jan. 23-27.   

According to its website, the American Heart Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To assist in the battle, schools can host Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart fundraisers that promote physical activity, heart healthy living and community service.

 During their gym classes, students rotated among stations to enhance their basketball skills by practicing ball control and making jump shots and layups. Afterward, the classes participated in a knockout tournament, eliminating each other by scoring baskets before their opponent until two finalists were left to face off in a championship match-up.

Helping Others Through The Love Of Sports

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Seventh- and eighth-graders at Woodland Middle School put their love for sports into practice as they raised money for Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The school’s athletic department hosted two fundraisers to benefit the causes — a powder puff football game and a volleyball tournament.

Assistant Principals Patricia Graham and Christine Egan led two teams of students for the football game. Students, teachers and administrators paid $2 to watch the game on the school’s football field, raising a total of $780 for Memorial Sloan Kettering.

On Jan. 3, the girls volleyball team held a round-robin tournament, where teams played each other for five minutes in elimination rounds until two final teams were set to play. The tournament raised $200 for St. Jude.

Hearts For Our Heroes

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Bowling Green Elementary School students expressed their gratitude and appreciation for U.S. troops by creating more than 700 Valentine’s Day cards for veterans.

The young students inscribed their cards with meaningful messages and decorated them with illustrations, stickers, paper cutouts and more. Impressed by the vast amount of these thoughtful cards, Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano offered to send them to hospitalized veterans as part of the “Valentine’s for Veterans” program.  


Honoring Our National Parks

Honoring Our National Parks
Honoring Our National Parks 2
Honoring Our National Parks 3
Fifth-graders at Meadowbrook Elementary School commemorated the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service by conducting research on the history of 25 U.S. parks.

For six weeks, the classes of Valerie Kasper, Emily Caroddo and Kara Riley researched the locations, wildlife and history of the parks including the Everglades, Zion, Grand Tetron and Arches during their computer class with the assistance of technology teacher Taylor Stoessel.

After compiling their information, the students spent an additional six weeks creating presentations using Microsoft Office Sway. The program allowed them to present their final projects to their classmates with interactive videos and high-definition photos.

The activity, which aligned with the fifth-graders’ social studies curriculum, taught them valuable skills in research and public speaking while providing an in-depth lesson in U.S. geography and history.

ACCESS Meeting - March 21, 2017

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Super Bowl Scholars

Super Bowl Scholars
Super Bowl Scholars 2
Third-graders at Parkway Elementary School proved to be fantastic football fans as they completed several assignments related to the Super Bowl on Feb. 3.

Kristi De Lace’s class celebrated the Falcons vs. Patriots face-off with projects, activities and treats. The students researched the history of the Super Bowl and its past winners, presented their facts through charts, learned about biographies as they answered questions about Matt Ryan and Tom Brady, and predicted this year’s winner. They used multiplication to review Super Bowl squares and improved their geography and map skills as they located states that hosted previous Super Bowls.
 
The day was not without its artistic element, which the third-graders embraced as they created persuasive posters designed to influence others’ decisions about which team to root for. The front of the classroom was decorated with the creative posters, with equal representation of both the Patriots and Falcons.
 
Overall, the Super Bowl learning experience involved reading, writing, technology, research and math. Thanks to parent volunteers, students enjoyed typical game-day snacks, football-themed lollipops and a field of cupcakes after completing their work.


Clarke HS VE Students Compete at Regional Trade Show

Clarke HS VE Students Compete at Regional Trade Show

The Virtual Enterprise class at W.T. Clarke High School demonstrated their business acumen and ingenuity when they competed in the Virtual Enterprise International Northeast Regional Trade Show at Farmingdale State College on Jan. 13.

According to its website, VEI is a global business simulation that offers students a competitive edge through project-based, collaborative learning and the development of 21st-century skills in entrepreneurship, global business, problem-solving, communication, personal finance and technology.

Consisting of 19 seniors, W.T. Clarke’s VE class mimics the operations of a real business, with departments including accounting, marketing, human resources and web design. The company is entirely student-run, with teacher Joseph Pavia acting as its consultant. In addition to managing its daily operations on a multi-departmental level, the students also evaluate employee growth and receive a virtual salary that can be spent on products and services offered by other schools’ VE firms, both local and international.

W.T. Clarke’s firm, Munchkings, sells snack mixes that are customized to targeted consumer groups’ tastes. The “Lazy Man Mix,” for example, is an assortment of potato chips, popcorn, chocolate candies and mini chocolate chip cookies and is geared toward the armchair athlete, while the “Veggie Mix” is a blend for the more health-conscious consisting of veggie straws, veggie chips and pressure-cooked potato chips.

At the regional show, the Munchkings’ administrative team presented their 30-page business plan and a 15-minute PowerPoint presentation to a panel of judges. In addition, undercover judges walked the sales floor to analyze the businesses of more than 900 students. They awarded the Munchkings first place for best sales pitch and second place for most enthusiastic firm, the latter bestowed upon those companies that exhibit the most passion, energy and perseverance.

“This is not an ordinary class,” said Pavia. “My students always amaze me with their dedication, hard work and perseverance. I am very fortunate to teach this class and am beyond grateful for the incredible support I receive from my administrators.”  

The results have not calculated, but if the Munchkings advance, they will participate in VEI’s 2017 Youth Business Summit, a national-level competition that will be held in New York City from April 3-5. This competition brings school firms from all over the U.S. and the world to trade live with each other.

The East Meadow School District wishes the Munchkings much success as they continue in the competition.



United Through Art

United Through Art

Lessons in character education were promoted as the entire student body at Bowling Green Elementary School lent their hand to a “unity mural” outside of the school’s library.

The project, led by Joyce Raimondo, founder and director of Imagine That! Art Education, was open to all first- through fifth-graders. With smocks tied on and paintbrushes in hand, the students worked together to create a dynamic, colorful masterpiece that illustrates positive character traits and embodies the school’s motto of respect, citizenship, trustworthiness and caring.

Their teamwork and collaboration resulted in a masterpiece that teachers, staff and administrators will enjoy for years to come.

East Meadow Board of Education Recognizes Alan Hodish

East Meadow Board of Education Recognizes Alan Hodish
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During their Jan. 19 meeting, the East Meadow Board of Education recognized district resident Alan Hodish for his service to the community. The Board presented him with a certificate of recognition for his many years of advocacy and dedicated service to the children of East Meadow.
    
“This recognition is long overdue,” said Superintendent of Schools Leon Campo. “On behalf of the administration, school district and Board, I am particularly proud to recognize one of our most outstanding East Meadowites, Alan Hodish, for his involvement in the East Meadow community. Alan is highly deserving of our praise because he has worked tirelessly over many years to develop a relationship with our students that has made a difference in their lives.”  
    
The evening was punctuated with musical performances by the brass ensemble from W.T. Clarke High School and kindergartners from Barnum Woods and Parkway elementary schools. Led by the Enrichment Through the Arts teachers, the Barnum Woods young children, sang “I’m a Little Snowman” to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot” and “Down by the Bay” while the Parkway kindergarteners dressed in patriotic colors, performed “Red, White and Blue.”   


2017-2018 Application for ALL Non-Public Students

The attached application is for ALL Non-Public Students for the 2017-2018 School Year.

Residents are reminded of New York State Education Law 3635-2 requiring parents/guardians of students who plan to attend private or parochial school to submit a written request annually to their public school district.

The East Meadow School District must be in receipt of the application for transportation and textbooks on or before the New York State Education Department's legal deadline of April 1 to be considered for the following school year. In order for the April 1 request letter to be considered, all students must be officially registered with the East Meadow School District. Applications must be, according to statute, filed annually. A separate application is required for each child.

It is the applicant's responsibility to confirm the district's receipt of your application prior to April 1.

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East Meadow Eighth-Graders Conquer Geography Bee

East Meadow Eighth-Graders Conquer Geography Bee
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Woodland Middle School’s Mitchell Goldberg and W.T. Clarke Middle School’s Nicholas Spano, recently earned their school’s geography bee champion title.
    
Held at their respective buildings, middle schoolers participated in the school-level competition of the 29th annual National Geographic Bee, for which they answered questions covering numerous facets of geography in the United States and the world.
    
Both winners will join students from across the country in taking an online written test as part of the next round of competition. The top 100 scorers in each state will then be eligible to compete in their state bee. The state winners will advance to the national championship rounds in Washington, D.C., where they will have the chance to win a $50,000 college scholarship.
    
The district wishes Mitchell and Nicholas much success as they continue in the competition.

Spring 2017 Continuing Education Guide

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Secondary Schools Late Buses

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East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond Voter Guide Newsletter

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Singer Jared Campbell Inspires East Meadow School Community

Singer Jared Campbell Inspires East Meadow School Community

Students, parents, staff and administrators in the district experienced an evening of resilience, empowerment and hope when singer/songwriter Jared Campbell led an ACCESS Workshop on Jan. 17.

Sponsored by the East Meadow PTA Council in conjunction with the East Meadow Kiwanis, the concert took place at the Leon J. Campo Salisbury Center, where Campbell performed songs containing powerful stories. The singer/guitarist also visited all of the district’s elementary schools over the course of the week to share positive messages with the students.

“Music has the ability to transcend words,” said Campbell, who visits schools across the country on national tours. “I want my music to leave an impact on kids and get them to think about how they’re treating one another, what they’re going after in life and how to work together.”

Campbell kicked off the show with “Life Is Good,” an original song about focus. “As students grow up and go through life, honing in on the power of focus is huge,” he said. Among other tunes were “Change the World,” about looking out for others, and “Life I Haven’t Lived Yet,” conveying the importance of hard work and believing in oneself.

The audience was entertained by these and many other songs, often clapping along or echoing the lyrics. Campbell discussed every song that he presented and encouraged attendees to think about the ways these messages could be applied to their own lives.

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work

Woodland Middle School students participated in a variety of team building activities on Jan. 13.

The Social Emotional Learning Club held a game-themed Mix It Up Day for sixth- and seventh-graders during their lunch periods to meet new people, develop their social skills and work in teams. During their homeroom period, the students received different colored bracelets that grouped them with new peers. Together, they took part in activities inspired by board games such as Apples to Apples, Uno, Scrabble and Monopoly.

Across the hall, eighth-graders practiced their team building skills with exercises and gaming applications. Working collaboratively to accomplish a common goal, they participated in exercises such as human rock, paper, scissors and land mine travel, where teams had to direct their classmates across a field of “land mines” without stepping on a mine or bumping into another competitor. The students also teamed up to play the puzzle game Candy Crush.



Clarke Competes at DECA Regionals

Clarke Competes at DECA Regionals
Following months of hard work and preparation, 70 members of the 140 W.T. Clarke High School DECA team competed against thousands of high school students in the Nassau County Regional DECA Competition held at Freeport High School on Jan. 7.
    
According to its website, DECA is a nonprofit student organization that prepares emerging leaders and entrepreneurs in marketing, finance, hospitality and management in high schools and colleges around the world.
    
These talented Clarke DECA members participated in competitive events that are aligned with the National Curriculum Standards in marketing, business management and administration, finance, and hospitality and tourism. Students were evaluated on written components, such as an exam, or on a manual as well as share an interactive component before an industry professional who served as a judge.
    
The district commends this remarkable team and wishes them much success as they compete in the State-level competition in Rochester, New York, from March 8-10.

Visit Us on Facebook

The East Meadow School District and Public Library invite all community residents to visit its official Facebook page, which will provide information related to the school district’s and public library’s joint bond referendum. The bond vote is scheduled for Tuesday, March 7, 2017.
    
To visit the page, search “East Meadow Schools and Public Library Joint Bond” in the search function on Facebook. The account is non-commenting, meaning the public will not be able to post comments. Its purpose is to provide the community with an additional source of information regarding the upcoming bond vote.
    

Continuing Dr. King’s Legacy

Continuing Dr. King’s Legacy

In observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, second-graders at Barnum Woods Elementary School studied Dr. King’s dream of living in a world of equality, compassion and kindness.

Teacher Denise DeMarco began the lesson by reading the picture-book biography, “Martin’s Big Words” by Doreen Rappaport. The book explained Dr. King’s life journey as a civil rights activist in pursuit of a world where everyone is treated fairly.   

Afterward, students brainstormed aspirations inspired by Dr. King’s message. Among them were “treating everyone fairly and with kindness,” “that there will be no wars” and, to quote Dr. King, “that people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”  

With these aspirations, students drew themselves in an “I have a dream” activity using one of the above wishes.




Reporting Live From Parkway Elementary School

Reporting Live From Parkway Elementary School

Fourth-graders at Parkway Elementary School got their feet wet in exploring natural disasters and the media. After conducting research and planning out their segments over the course of several weeks, students in Kelly Zawasky and Allison Cellura’s class presented a series of natural disaster news broadcasts on Jan. 13.

The project, part of the students’ literacy curriculum, posed the essential question of “How do people respond to natural disasters?” The fourth-graders responded to this inquiry by researching different types of natural disasters and watching numerous weather broadcasts to understand what information is needed for a typical weather report, which proved useful when the time came to prepare their scripts.

The class also studied the importance of eyewitness interviews and the role of the meteorologist as they learned about firsthand and secondhand accounts of events. In addition, they learned about the elements of dramatic text, which they incorporated into their scripts. Finally, they created their own backdrops and ran through several dress rehearsals to ensure they were camera-ready.

Along with on-set reporting from the news desk, each broadcast involved “on-site” scenes in front of the backdrops. Students were creative in their use of props and costumes as they portrayed the roles of reporters, meteorologists and civilians impacted by the events.  

Broadcasts included coverage of Japan’s earthquake and tsunami of 2011, the multiple-vortex tornado that struck Joplin, Missouri in 2011, the Great Blizzard of 1888 and the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.




W.T. Clarke Senior Named a 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Scholar

Regeneron Science Talent Scholar
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Alby Joseph, a senior at W.T. Clarke High School has been recognized as a scholar in the 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Search. This program is considered to be the nation’s oldest and most prestigious pre-college science competition for high school students.
    
According to its website, the Regeneron STS is a program of the Society for Science and the Public that recognizes and empowers the most promising young scientists in the U.S. who are creating the ideas and solutions to solve our most urgent challenges.
    
“It’s an incredible feeling to be named a Regeneron Scholar,” said Alby. “When I found out, my heart was racing a million miles a minute because not only did they appreciate my work, but they also thought I have what it takes to be a real scientist.”
    
During the summer of 2016 Alby interned in a laboratory at Stony Brook University, where he worked under the mentorship of Professor Iwao Ojima to study a new way of treating pain by attacking a specific protein. After learning about the Regeneron competition through the internship and receiving hearty support from Ojima and Clarke research teacher Erika Rotolo, Alby submitted his project, titled “Optimized Fatty Acid Binding Protein Inhibitors Investigating the Viability of a Novel Pain Relief Mechanism.”
    
In addition to this submission, Alby was required to answer several essay questions, provide his transcript and submit instructors’ recommendations.
    
Each of the 300 scholars received a $2,000 award from Regeneron with a matching donation to his or her school. A total of $1.2 million in scholar awards are granted to inspire more young people to engage in science. Forty of the scholars will be announced as finalists on Jan. 24, an opportunity where they will be invited to Washington, D.C. in March to participate in final judging, have their work on public display, meet with notable scientists and compete for awards, including the top prize of $250,000.
    
Aside from his love of science, Alby has another passion — music. Playing the cello since he was a fourth-grader at Bowling Green Elementary School, he gained confidence by being creative and using music as an outlet to unwind from the everyday pressures of schoolwork and extracurricular activities. His outstanding musical talents have qualified him to perform in the All-State Festival at the New York State School Music Association’s 2016 Winter Conference, the upcoming National Association for Music Education’s 2017 Biennial Eastern Division Conference in April, the Nassau Music Educators Association All-County Festival and the Long Island String Festival Association’s Nassau Secondary Festival .
    
Additionally, he serves as co-president of the school’s Tri-M Music, Science and National honor societies. He is also a member of the Math Honor Society, the school newspaper, Mathletes, Science Olympiad, and has performed for the last three years in the pit orchestra for the school’s plays.
    
Along with this exceptional achievement, Alby is also the Clarke High School Class of 2017 valedictorian, a semifinalist in the 2016 National Merit Scholarship Program and a semifinalist in the 2016 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology.  
    
“Alby is the only student in my years at Clarke High School to receive semifinalist standing in both the Regeneron Science Talent Search and the Siemens Competition,” said high school Principal Timothy Voels. “He is a humble young man who is a superb Clarke student.”     
    
The support Alby has received from his family, friends, teachers and peers has made him grateful for his time at the high school. “I’m really appreciative of the environment at Clarke because it has helped me and encouraged me to keep going and do what I love,” he said. “Here, it’s more about supporting one another and trying to get everyone ahead.”
    
While Alby enjoys his last semester at Clarke, he will be competing in the Long Island Science and Engineering Fair in February and participating in the NAfME All-Eastern Conference in April, while looking forward to prom and graduation in late June. His postsecondary plans include attending college to study chemical engineering.   
    
The district congratulates Alby for achieving this honorable distinction and wishes him tremendous success as he finishes his senior year and pursues his interests in college.      

East Meadow High School Sophomore Named HOBY Ambassador

HOBY Ambassador
Clara Song, a sophomore at East Meadow High School, has been selected as a Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership ambassador.
    
According to its website, HOBY, founded in 1958, is an organization that inspires and develops the global community of youth and volunteers to a life dedicated to leadership, service and innovation.
    
As an ambassador, Clara will participate with other teenagers at the HOBY Leadership Conference, where she will collaborate with recognized leaders in business, government, education and other professions to discuss current world issues.
    
Clara was selected through a rigorous process that included an interview by faculty, administration and a former HOBY ambassador. She unanimously impressed the panel with her poise, confidence and genuine concern for others.

Clara is a very conscientious student who is involved in numerous extracurricular activities. She is a member of the school’s STEM, Pre-Med and Key clubs and an active member of the Science, Social Studies and English honor societies. She also volunteers at Winthrop-University Hospital and conducts her own research in the medical chemistry lab at St. John’s University.

Last summer, Clara was fortunate enough to participate in a Global Health Initiative trip to the Dominican Republic, and she is currently planning a community service trip to Peru.  

With a passion for science and a desire to help others, Clara aspires to pursue a career in the medical field, specifically in global health.

Student Artwork Displayed at District’s Annual Exhibit

Student Artwork Displayed

Students spanning first through 12th grade in the District were recognized for their talents and creativity during the district’s “A Young Artist Exhibition” on Dec. 20.

Students, families and faculty members browsed the 130 pieces of artwork on display at the Leon J. Campo Salisbury Center as W. Tresper Clarke High School’s string quartet performed winter classics. Those who had their work on display had been chosen for their adept technique in collage, painting, drawing and photography.

The district extends special thanks to Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction Cindy Munter, Director of Music and Art Kathryn Behr, Art Chairperson Heather Anastasio, art show coordinator Lisa Young and the district Art Faculty for their hard work and dedication in arranging this year’s gallery.  




Buzzing with Words

Buzzing with Words
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Two students in the district were recently crowned school spelling bee champions: W.T. Clarke Middle School seventh-grader Nicholas Espinosa and Woodland Middle School sixth-grader Sarah Chacko.  
    
A total of 42 middle school students participated in the school-level competition of the Scripps Spelling Bee at their respective buildings. Nicholas claimed the victory at Clarke with “voltmeter,” while Sarah secured first place at Woodland by correctly spelling “reminisce.”    
    
Both winners will compete in the regional bee at Hofstra University in February. The district wishes them much success as they continue in the competition.

Festival of Lights

Festival of Lights

First-graders in Camille Iovino-Coli’s class at Barnum Woods Elementary School held a “Festival of Lights” party to observe the different holidays celebrated in their class.

Prior to the celebration, the children studied the variety of cultures, traditions and religious holidays celebrated by their fellow classmates. They learned about the similarities and differences of Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Diwali. The main message Iovino-Coli hoped her students would take away is to be respectful of one another’s cultural diversity.

For the festival, families brought in treats representing their ethnic backgrounds. The class and guests enjoyed latkes (a Jewish potato pancake), Cozonac (a Romanian pound cake), kheer (a Muslim rice pudding) and Pfeffernusse (German gingerbread cookies).

Additionally, each first-grader received a poster with candy canes and a writing activity to identify their favorite holiday tradition. Responses included spending time with family, decorating the tree and opening presents.

A Winter Wonderland of Music at East Meadow

A Winter Wonderland of Music at East Meadow

Months of preparation and practice paid off as students in the REACH program at W.T. Clarke Middle School and High School performed their winter concert .

Students, teachers, central administrators and family members gathered in Clarke High School’s Little Theatre to hear a variety of winter classics, including “Winter Wonderland,” “Let It Snow” and “Jingle Bell Rock.”

Closing out the show, the students performed “We Wish You a Happy Holiday” in American Sign Language with the help of Clarke High School students who are studying ASL.

The East Meadow school community gives these young musicians a standing ovation for their talents and dedication.

Spreading Holiday Magic

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Members of the fourth- and fifth-grade student council at Barnum Woods Elementary School collected more than 100 toys for the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys for Tots program.
    
Toys for Tots collects new, unwrapped toys every year from October through December to provide holiday gifts to less fortunate children in the community.
    
From Nov. 30 to Dec. 14, the student council accepted donations from students, teachers, administrators and other school community members. Council members displayed posters, sang jingles on the morning announcements and visited classrooms throughout the two-week drive, stressing the importance of giving back and helping others.
    
On Dec. 19, Staff Sergeant J.D. Quinton and Sergeants Eliezer Gomez and Carlos Hernandez collected seven boxes of new toys from the school to help local families in Nassau County. Staff Sgt. Quinton thanked the students for their generosity and for helping families this holiday season.

Finding Presents on the Tree

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Embodying the giving spirit, Parkway Elementary School organized its annual Holiday Giving Tree drive to help local families this holiday season.
    
Every year from Nov. 30 to Dec. 15, Parkway displays a holiday tree covered with ornaments, each designating a present to provide for children and their families. Students, teachers, administrators and members of the community are encouraged to purchase gifts for children ranging in age from young toddler to 15 years old. This year’s donated gifts included board games, toy cars, snow tubes and clothing.  
    
After all gifts were collected, members of Parkway’s PTA and student volunteers wrapped each of them in preparation for delivery to the families.
    
As a special treat, each family will receive a red stocking filled with action figures, pencils, candy canes and playing cards.

Decking the Doors

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Students and staff at Parkway Elementary School spread winter cheer on Dec. 14 by transforming their classroom doors into winter-themed wonderlands for the annual Decorate the Door contest.
    
Sporting their favorite ugly holiday sweaters and applying their creativity and collaboration skills, every class in grades K-5, as well as the school’s ancillary departments, decorated their doors to reflect a winter theme. Competition criteria required them to display a winter theme in a tangible and clever way that was visually appealing, imaginative and creative, and exuded school spirit or Parkway paraphernalia. Judging was based on originality, complexity, creativity and relevance to the theme.
    
Winners for each grade were announced, acknowledging the classes that most innovatively used materials such as lights, cotton balls, paper snowflakes and wrapping paper to transform their doors. Among the ancillary departments, the main office reigned supreme with their “Gingerbread Lane” theme.
    
Along with their first-place ribbons, the K-2 winners received a movie day with popcorn and juice, those who placed first in grades 3-5 won a game of freedom ball during gym, juice and cookies, and the main office earned bragging rights.